When it comes to lashes, it’s a truly individual choice. My colleague, and friend, Georgina and I have different loves. Hers? Mascara (see blog post, and love note, based on her unwavering loyalty to it). Mine? Semi-permanent extensions. Of course, the choices don’t end there: mascara, strip lashes, short-term clusters, tinting, lifting, semi-permanent individuals – I mean, the list is endless. And now folks, there’s a new kid on the block – magnetic strip lashes.

I have no shame in saying I am a devout user of semi-permanent individual lashes. The only beauty vice I have (aside from the bleach), I forego any blow dry, gel manicure or pedicure, nay I’ve even quit my regular spray tans (although I will use a drop of Isle of Paradise every now and then). But my semi-permanent lashes aren’t going anywhere. I get them infilled every three weeks and I feel like a new woman every time I do. They just do what mascara can’t, and I wake up feeling a teeny tiny bit less like a tired mum-on-the-run and can almost do the school drop off bare faced (not completely – thank you acne scarring).

However, in one enforced break from the routine – I occasionally like to check my real lashes could in fact cope on their own if the apocalypse ever happened – I had my head turned by the newest member of the lash umbrella – magnetic lashes.

And while newish, in actual fact, they’re more popular than you might think. While we know that mascara has been hit hard of late, with a predicted slowdown in sales from 4 percent to 2 percent in 2021, it may come as no surprise that, as highlighted by Refinery29, the top trending beauty search of 2018 was: how to apply magnetic lashes. Spoiler: with difficulty.

And while I may have not quite got the application knack, when I did finally get it right, I was suitably impressed. No messy glue, no fear of smudging, and the best bit? You can whip them off at the end of the night and pop them back in their little case, ready to be reused. But that’s not the only positive. While the safety police have questioned the possible problems caused by the electromagnetic frequency emitted, it seems it poses significantly less of a threat than the common strip lash. As Founder of the ThirdEyeVision Foundation. Dr. Tsai told Refinery, “I’ve seen more harm done with lash extensions and glue-ons — like styes, allergic blepharitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and conjunctival erosion. From what I’ve seen in my exam room over the years, it’s best to stick with magnetic lashes or mascara.”

For me, I’ll stick to my semi-permanents. However, those that are looking to wave goodbye to their wand, or are uneasy about applying glue so close to the most delicate part of the face – magnetic could be the answer to the lash prayer they’ve all been looking for. I’ll keep them as a back-up for now…